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These four gold coins had drawn the minimum opening bid of $850, with a week to go in the auction.

State Treasurer John Perdue’s latest online auction is typically heavy on collectible currency, distinguished by four U.S. gold coins, a 1937 Antietam commemorative half dollar and three Carson City dollars.

The four gold coins have immediately attracted the minimum bid of $850. No other bidders have stepped up. The coins, contained in one grouping or “lot,” consist of a 1900 five-dollar coin; a 1914-D five-dollar coin; a 1910 two-and-a-half-dollar coin; and a 1926 two-and-a-half dollar coin.

Also quickly attracting the minimum bid of $275 is a 1937 Antietam commemorative half dollar. Antietam, fought just across the Potomac River from Shepherdstown, W.Va., goes down as the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with a combined tally of 22,717 dead, wounded, or missing.

This 1937 Antietam coin commemorates the renowned Civil War battle near Shepherdstown. It had drawn the minimum opening bid of $275.

To bid on the Antietam coin or other items, go to www.wvtreasury.com and click on “Auctions.” Click on the large online auction graphic. The auction ends precisely 11 a.m. EST June 8. A user must establish an account to bid. All proceeds remain in the rightful owner’s account as continued attempts are made to find him or her.

“We sincerely urge all West Virginians to log on and submit bids for these valuable coins,” Treasurer Perdue said. “Our goal here is not only that rightful owners get something for property we no longer have room to house, but state residents join in with bidders from across the country in getting a chance at these rare finds.”

The other item of particular interest to attract bidding are three Carson City dollars issued from 1878 to 1883. One participant has met the minimum bid of $600.

A few pocket watches and pieces of jewelry round out the auction items, taken from abandoned safe deposit boxes. After five years of no activity, banks are required to turn over the contents to the State Treasury.

Treasury staffers hold onto the items longer, in hopes they will be claimed, while amassing enough volume for an auction. Currency is usually well represented because of its collectability and safe deposit box-friendly size.






The Treasury does not collect state taxes. Visit the The West Virginia State Tax Department for assistance.

West Virginia State Treasurer's Office
1900 Kanawha Boulevard
Capitol Complex Building #1, Room E-145
Charleston, West Virginia 25305
304-558-5000 Toll Free: 800-422-7498
Hours: 8am-5pm (ET)

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